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Video Performances

The Trees on the Mountain

From Susannah (1955), by Carlisle Floyd.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Let The Bright Seraphim

From Samson (1743), by George Frideric Händel.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews. Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

The magnificent trumpet aria, “Let the Bright Seraphim”, occurs at the end of Händel’s oratorio, Samson (HWV 57), and is a joyous, uplifting aria set directly after a funeral march. Interestingly, it was not the original ending to the work, and was added by Händel some twelve months after he had originally declared the work to be finished. The character of Manoah calls upon the Israelites to cease their mourning for Samson, which is followed thus by the trumpet aria. Sadly, we were not able to find a trumpeter for this performance. The trumpet part is instead written into the piano arrangement.

Mir ist die Ehre widerfahren


From Der Rosenkavalier (1911), by Richard Strauss.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Mezzo-Soprano: Ellen Malone
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

I Want Magic!


From A Streetcar Named Desire (1995), by André Previn.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

André George Previn (born Andreas Ludwig Priwin) was born in Berlin, Germany, but became a naturalised American citizen after moving as a young boy to Los Angeles with his Jewish Russian family to escape the Nazis. He has won four Academy Awards, ten Grammys, and is a pianist, conductor and composer. A Streetcar Named Desire is an opera composed by Previn in 1995, with the libretto by Philip Littell. It is based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Tennessee Williams (1947) and received its premiere at the San Francisco Opera during the 1998-99 season. The play is about a culture clash between two very strong characters: Blanche DuBois, a Southern Belle, and Stanley Kowalski, a dominating, physically and emotionally abusive man from the industrial working class. Blanche lives a life of grandeur and pretense, alluding to a life of virtue and culture, which, in reality, masks a serious alcohol problem. Blanche has arrived at the apartment of her sister, Stella Kowalski, who has a complex relationship with her husband, Stanley, based on a sexual chemistry that Blanche doesn’t understand. Stella welcomes Blanche with much apprehension, as she doesn’t think that Blanche and Stanley will get along — and she’s right. The situation worsens as Stanley discovers Blanche’s true past, and attempts to “unmask” it to her; the final collision that the two characters face is a scene in which Stanley rapes Blanche, which results in a nervous breakdown for her. In the closing moments, Blanche utters her signature line to the kindly doctor who leads her away: “Whoever you are, I have always depended on the kindness of strangers.”

The Black Swan


From The Medium (1946), by Gian Carlo Menotti.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Mezzo-Soprano: Bronwyn Douglass
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Monica’s Waltz


From The Medium (1946), by Gian Carlo Menotti.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Ain’t It A Pretty Night


From Susannah (1955), by Carlisle Floyd.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Youth, Day, Old Age, and Night

Youth, large, lusty, loving–youth full of grace, force, fascination,
Do you know that Old Age may come after you with equal grace,
force, fascination?

Day full-blown and splendid-day of the immense sun, action,
ambition, laughter,
The Night follows close with millions of suns, and sleep and
restoring darkness.

(Walt Whitman)

Composed by Ned Rorem in 1954.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Alleluia

Composed by Ned Rorem in 1946.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal

Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white;
Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;
Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font:
The firefly wakens: waken thou with me.

Now droops the milk-white peacock like a ghost,
And like a ghost she glimmers on to me.

Now lies the Earth all Danaë to the stars,
And all thy heart lies open unto me.

Now slides the silent meteor on, and leaves
A shining furrow, as thy thoughts in me.

Now folds the lily all her sweetness up,
And slips into the bosom of the lake:
So fold thyself, my dearest, thou, and slip
Into my bosom and be lost in me.

(Lord Alfred Tennyson)


Composed by Ned Rorem in 1963.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

The Serpent

There was a Serpent who had to sing.
There was. There was.
He simply gave up Serpenting.
Because. Because.
He didn’t like his Kind of Life;
He couldn’t find a proper Wife;
He was a Serpent with a soul;
He got no Pleasure down his Hole.
And so, of course, he had to Sing,
And Sing he did, like Anything!
The Birds, they were, they were Astounded;
And various Measures Propounded
To stop the Serpent’s Awful Racket:
They bought a Drum. He wouldn’t
Whack it.
They sent, —you always send, —to Cuba
And got a Most Commodious Tuba;
They got a Horn, they got a Flute,
But Nothing would suit.
He said, “Look, Birds, all this is futile:
I do not like to Bang or Tootle.”
And then he cut loose with a Horrible Note
That practically split the Top of his Throat.
“You see,” he said, with a Serpent’s Leer,
“I’m Serious about my Singing Career!”
And the Woods Resounded with many a Shriek
As the Birds flew off to the end of Next Week.

(Theodore Roethke)

Composed by Ned Rorem in 1972.

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.

Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

Oh! Quante Volte


From I Capuleti e i Montecchi (1830) by Vincenzo Bellini

Soprano: Pamela Andrews
Pianist: Alan Hicks

Filmed and recorded in Llewellyn Hall, Canberra, by the Australian National University, November 2010, on behalf of Pamela Andrews.
Edited for YouTube by JRR4FILM Productions.

© JRR4FILM Productions 2011

“Oh! quante volte” is a lyric coloratura aria from the first act of the Italian opera “I Capuleti e i Montecchi” by Vincenzo Bellini, and is performed by the character Giulietta: the daughter of Capellio, and lover of Romeo. The scene is set on Giulietta’s balcony in the palace of Capulet, Verona, Italy, in the fifteenth century; Giulietta is longing for Romeo to come and see her; she wishes to see his silhouette in the light of the day, and hear his sigh, which reminds her of the breeze.

There is in souls a sympathy

There is in souls a sympathy with sounds:
And as the mind is pitch’d the ear is pleased
With melting airs, or martial, brisk or grave;
Some chord in unison with what we hear
Is touch’d within us, and the heart replies.

William Cowper

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